Sunday, February 12, 2012

HBS Military Prospective Students' Day

Just a heads up that HBS is holding its second annual (not actually sure if it's going to be annual, but it's a good bet it will be) Military Prospective Students Day on March 5th, on the HBS campus. This event is meant to introduce future applicants to HBS and to the benefits of an MBA.

I highly recommend that prospective military applicants attend this event if they can make it. The school really goes out of its way to introduce prospective students to the program and answer common questions such as life on campus, career opportunities post-MBA, and financing your education. This is also a good opportunity to meet some current former military students who can help answer and maybe even guide some of your application in the future. HBS military members are extremely helpful - just like most HBS students - and you should definitely introduce yourself and make some connections.

Time to sign up may be running short. Go here: http://www.hbs.edu/mba/admissions/events.html and click on "On campus" at the bottom of the screen to open a list of events. You can register by selecting "Military Prospective Students Day." If for some reason you are not able to register in time, contact the AFAA (Armed Forces Alumni Association) on campus, or the school directly to see if they can still squeeze you in.

I was honored to help lead the inaugural Military Prospective Students Day last year, and am very glad to see the tradition continue. I also noticed that Wharton started doing the same thing this year as well. Good talent is always in demand!

As a side note, I would also recommend reading this interview with Dee Leopold. It's not a new article, but it does help provide more transparency and insight into the application process. If there's one takeaway I would take from the interview, is that admissions is highly driven by applicant profile - and less by what some applicants may feel is their individual achievements. One's upbringing, demographic background, undergraduate school, and place and type of employment, and to a much more subjective level - temperament - tend to dominate the selection process.